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January 09, 2008, at 11:48 AM by Bronco Bill - Change Forum link
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The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Discussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).

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The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Discussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).

December 13, 2007, at 07:41 AM by DemFromCT - edit
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See also: [http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/pandemic/pandemic_main.html|Preparing the Justice System for a Pandemic Influenza and Other Public Health Emergencies]] from Bureau of Justice Assistance

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See also: Preparing the Justice System for a Pandemic Influenza and Other Public Health Emergencies from Bureau of Justice Assistance

December 13, 2007, at 07:41 AM by DemFromCT - edit
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See also: [http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/pandemic/pandemic_main.html|Preparing the Justice System for a Pandemic Influenza and Other Public Health Emergencies]] from Bureau of Justice Assistance

August 10, 2006, at 09:07 AM by pogge - restore
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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \

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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

August 10, 2006, at 03:53 AM by pscig6vmailru - ngtones]
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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \

July 16, 2006, at 12:48 PM by pogge - restore
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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \

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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

July 16, 2006, at 12:26 PM by dtvic1pmailru - gtones]
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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

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The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \

July 08, 2006, at 11:41 PM by DavidCary - revert incomprehensible addition (spam?)
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Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians Silberwasser guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

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Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

May 01, 2006, at 10:33 AM by steve - minor edit
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Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians [http://www.kolloidales-silber.at Silberwasser] guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

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Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians Silberwasser guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

May 01, 2006, at 10:32 AM by steve - minor edit
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Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

to:

Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians [http://www.kolloidales-silber.at Silberwasser] guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

March 19, 2006, at 05:44 AM by lugon - add link to specific financial section
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For more on the possible disruption of essential services, please visit and help us build the page on Anticipated Problems.

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For more on the possible disruption of essential services, and possible action (reaction, proaction) regarding such disruption, please visit and help us build the page on Anticipated Problems. Specifically, you may want to look at the financial section.

February 05, 2006, at 10:56 PM by cassandra - wikitrail
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November 13, 2005, at 08:18 PM by DemFromCT - add link
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The Economics of Avian Influenza collects information on the economic impact of a pandemic. In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

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The Economics of Avian Influenza collects information on the economic impact of a pandemic. In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it (worst case) could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. A more recent business preparedness appraisal from the same firm can be found here. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

October 26, 2005, at 07:05 AM by cassandra - nav
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October 24, 2005, at 12:43 PM by cassandra - fm
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Legal Issues

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Legal Issues

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Ethics

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Ethics

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Economics

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Economics

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Politics

The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).

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Politics

The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Discussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).

October 20, 2005, at 08:20 PM by pogge - restore group link
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October 20, 2005, at 01:31 PM by cassandra - editing copy
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(:nogroup:) (:title Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns:)

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Ian Welsh’s two-part essay, The Economics of a Flu Pandemic, discusses the economic ramifications of a pandemic before, during and after the outbreak, including the managing of scarcities, the emergence of black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. → Ian’s essay is meant to get the conversation going on the Economic Concerns page.

In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

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The Economics of Avian Influenza collects information on the economic impact of a pandemic. In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

Ian Welsh’s two-part essay, The Economics of a Flu Pandemic, discusses the economic ramifications of a pandemic before, during and after the outbreak, including the managing of scarcities, the emergence of black markets, rationing and other similiar matters.

For more on the possible disruption of essential services, please visit and help us build the page on Anticipated Problems.

October 20, 2005, at 12:16 PM by cassandra - fm
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Legal Issues · Ethics Issues in Pandemics · Economic Concerns · Politics of Avian Influenza

• The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

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Legal Issues

The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

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Ethics

The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness — for example the rationing of scarce resources, the ethics of triage or “Truth-telling” vs. “Panic-mongering”.

Economics

Ian Welsh’s two-part essay, The Economics of a Flu Pandemic, discusses the economic ramifications of a pandemic before, during and after the outbreak, including the managing of scarcities, the emergence of black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. → Ian’s essay is meant to get the conversation going on the Economic Concerns page.

In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

Politics

The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).

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• The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness — for example the rationing of scarce resources, the ethics of triage or “Truth-telling” vs. “Panic-mongering”.

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• Ian Welsh’s two-part essay, The Economics of a Flu Pandemic, discusses the economic ramifications of a pandemic before, during and after the outbreak, including the managing of scarcities, the emergence of black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. → Ian’s essay is meant to get the conversation going on the Economic Concerns page.

In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

• The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).


October 06, 2005, at 03:44 PM by cassandra - nogroup
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• The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

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• The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine. \\\

October 06, 2005, at 03:44 PM by cassandra - nogroup
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(:title Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns:)

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September 30, 2005, at 10:13 PM by cassandra - markup
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Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

to:

Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

September 29, 2005, at 02:25 PM by cassandra - editing copy
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• The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki). Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

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• The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki).

September 29, 2005, at 02:18 PM by cassandra - editing copy
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• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

to:

• The Politics of Avian Influenza collects statements and news stories that touch on the political aspects of pandemic preparedness and public health policy around the world. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki). Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

September 29, 2005, at 01:04 PM by cassandra - editing copy
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• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki?. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

to:

• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

September 29, 2005, at 01:03 PM by cassandra - editing copy
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• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

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• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section; please use the Dicussion Forum or, for more elaborate statements, create an entry on the Opinion page (see also About FluWiki?. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

September 29, 2005, at 11:04 AM by cassandra - editing copy
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Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns

Legal | Ethics | Economic Concerns | Politics of Avian Influenza

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Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns

Legal Issues | Ethics Issues in Pandemics | Economic Concerns | Politics of Avian Influenza

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• The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness — for example rationing of scarce resources.

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• The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness — for example the rationing of scarce resources, the ethics of triage or “Truth-telling” vs. “Panic-mongering”.

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• The Economic Concerns page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

to:

• Ian Welsh’s two-part essay, The Economics of a Flu Pandemic, discusses the economic ramifications of a pandemic before, during and after the outbreak, including the managing of scarcities, the emergence of black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. → Ian’s essay is meant to get the conversation going on the Economic Concerns page.

In August of 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting that it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also this article by veteran influenza reporter Helen Branswell on financial concerns in Canada.

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September 29, 2005, at 10:38 AM by cassandra - wikitrail edit
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• The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness
(for example Isolation and Quarantine).

Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, some 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, the limited supplies of vaccine that were available during the 2004–2005 season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

• The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness
(for example rationing of scarce resources).

• The Economic Concerns page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

to:

• The Legal issues page collates legal questions surrounding a pandemic — for example the legal ramifications of Isolation and Quarantine.

Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Some 20–40,000 people die of influenza during a “regular” flu season. The limited supplies of vaccine that were available in the United States during the 2004–2005 flu season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with oseltamivir (Tamiflu)? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

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• The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness — for example rationing of scarce resources.

• The Economic Concerns page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

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September 24, 2005, at 01:08 PM by DemFromCT - add quicklinks
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September 17, 2005, at 08:05 AM by cassandra - layout & wikitrail
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Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns

> The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine).
Legal liability issues also come into play with resources before and during a pandemic. In the 2004–5 flu season we had shortages of regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, somewhere between 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, with the limited supplies of vaccine that were available, they were dispensed on either a first come first serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to say that one person was “sicker” or more needy of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if a decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was even in the setting where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. In the setting of a pandemic, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clear-cut federal guidelines, organizations will revert to lottery/first-come first-served methods to avoid future liability.

> The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., rationing).

> The Economic Concerns page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

> The Political Concerns page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

to:

Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns

• The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness
(for example Isolation and Quarantine).

Legal liability comes into play before and during a pandemic. During the 2004–2005 flu season, the United States experienced shortages of regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, some 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, the limited supplies of vaccine that were available during the 2004–2005 season were dispensed on either a first-come-first-serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to determine that one person was “sicker” or more in need of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if any kind of decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was so even in settings where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. If a pandemic occurs, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clear federal guidelines, organizations will revert to a lottery or first-come-first-serve basis to avoid potential liability.

• The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness
(for example rationing of scarce resources).

• The Economic Concerns page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

• The Politics of Avian Influenza page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

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September 13, 2005, at 02:47 AM by cassandra - trying a new color (drumroll)
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Legal, ethical, political and economic concerns

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Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns

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Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Issues

> The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine). \\\

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Legal, ethical, political and economic concerns

> The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine). \\

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> The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine).

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> The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine). \\\

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September 11, 2005, at 07:13 AM by cassandra - layout
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(:title Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Concerns:)

Legal, Ethical, Political and Economic Issues

> The Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine).

Legal liability issues also come into play with resources before and during a pandemic. In the 2004–5 flu season we had shortages of regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, somewhere between 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, with the limited supplies of vaccine that were available, they were dispensed on either a first come first serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to say that one person was “sicker” or more needy of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if a decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was even in the setting where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. In the setting of a pandemic, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clear-cut federal guidelines, organizations will revert to lottery/first-come first-served methods to avoid future liability.

> The Ethics page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., rationing).

> The Economic Concerns page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

> The Political Concerns page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

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Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine).

Legal liability issues also come into play with resources before and during a pandemic. In the 2004–5 flu season we had shortages of regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, somewhere between 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, with the limited supplies of vaccine that were available, they were dispensed on either a first come first serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to say that one person was “sicker” or more needy of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if a decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was even in the setting where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. In the setting of a pandemic, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clearcut federal guidelines, organizations will revert to lottery/first-come first-served methods to avoid future liability.

Ethical page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., rationing).

Economic page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

Political page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.


View recent changes in this category
RSS 2.0 feed for this category

to:
August 25, 2005, at 01:05 AM by cassandra - added BMO Nesbitt Burns report to economic issues
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Economic page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

to:

Economic page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. In August 2005, Toronto-based brokerage firm BMO Nesbitt Burns issued a report detailing the economic impact of an influenza pandemic on global markets, suggesting it could trigger a crisis similar to that of the Great Depression. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

August 18, 2005, at 09:25 AM by DemFromCT - added Helen Branswell\
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Economic page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going.

to:

Economic page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going. See also Helen Branswell’s article on financial and brokerage concerns in Canada.

July 21, 2005, at 08:10 PM by Ian - added economic link to the top title
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Legal, Ethical and Political Issues

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July 21, 2005, at 08:04 PM by Ian - Added Link to Economic Page
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Economic page is for discussions of economic issues before, during and after a pandemic, including the managing of scarcity, black markets, rationing and other similiar matters. Currently this consists of one starter article to get the conversation going.

July 09, 2005, at 08:50 AM by revere - typo (or for of)
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Legal liability issues also come into play with resources before and during a pandemic. In the 2004–5 flu season we had shortages or regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, somewhere between 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, with the limited supplies of vaccine that were available, they were dispensed on either a first come first serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to say that one person was “sicker” or more needy of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if a decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was even in the setting where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. In the setting of a pandemic, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clearcut federal guidelines, organizations will revert to lottery/first-come first-served methods to avoid future liability.

to:

Legal liability issues also come into play with resources before and during a pandemic. In the 2004–5 flu season we had shortages of regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, somewhere between 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, with the limited supplies of vaccine that were available, they were dispensed on either a first come first serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to say that one person was “sicker” or more needy of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if a decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was even in the setting where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. In the setting of a pandemic, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clearcut federal guidelines, organizations will revert to lottery/first-come first-served methods to avoid future liability.

July 08, 2005, at 11:46 PM by Leland Teng MD - Liabilities of chosing whom to treat are difficult to overcome
Added lines 5-6:

Legal liability issues also come into play with resources before and during a pandemic. In the 2004–5 flu season we had shortages or regular flu vaccine. Even in “regular” years, somewhere between 20–40,000 people die of influenza. For that reason, with the limited supplies of vaccine that were available, they were dispensed on either a first come first serve or lottery basis. Organizations were unwilling to say that one person was “sicker” or more needy of the vaccine than someone else. Everyone was afraid if a decision making system was employed that you would be sued by the family of the other person who died because they were not given the vaccine. This was even in the setting where the CDC gave physicians guidelines based on at least age and general types of illness to treat first. In the setting of a pandemic, do you treat the old or the young? Who would you vaccinate and who would you treat with tamiflu? Unless there are clearcut federal guidelines, organizations will revert to lottery/first-come first-served methods to avoid future liability.

July 04, 2005, at 03:08 PM by pogge - add Ethical link to heading
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Legal and Political Issues

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Legal, Ethical and Political Issues

July 04, 2005, at 02:08 PM by DemFromCT - added ethical link
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Ethical page is for ethical issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., rationing).

July 03, 2005, at 12:31 PM by DemFromCT - moved connotea panemic plan link to Experience and draft plans
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See also: Connotea links on pandemic planning

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July 03, 2005, at 08:03 AM by Declan Butler Nature - format
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Connotea links on pandemic planning

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See also: Connotea links on pandemic planning

July 03, 2005, at 08:02 AM by Declan Butler Nature - format
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See also Connotea page on pandemic planning?, http://www.connotea.org/tag/pandemic%20plans

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Connotea links on pandemic planning

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See also Connotea page on pandemic planning?, http://www.connotea.org/tag/pandemic%20plans

June 30, 2005, at 09:09 AM by DemFromCT - placeholder discussion of topics - DRAFT - will need modification
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Entries:

Isolation and Quarantine

Fact Sheet for Isolation and Quarantine

Summary: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1, 2005 executive order adding some Influenza viruses to the list of quarantinable diseases.

Introduction

Isolation and quarantine are two common public health strategies designed to protect the public by preventing exposure to infected or potentially infected persons.

In general, isolation refers to the separation of persons who have a specific infectious illness from those who are healthy and the restriction of their movement to stop the spread of that illness. Isolation is a standard procedure used in hospitals today for patients with tuberculosis and certain other infectious diseases.

Quarantine, in contrast, generally refers to the separation and restriction of movement of persons who, while not yet ill, have been exposed to an infectious agent and therefore may become infectious. Quarantine of exposed persons is a public health strategy, like isolation, that is intended to stop the spread of infectious disease.

Both isolation and quarantine may be conducted on a voluntary basis or compelled on a mandatory basis through legal authority.

State and Local Law

A state’s authority to compel isolation and quarantine within its borders is derived from its inherent “police power”—the authority of a state government to enact laws and promote regulations to safeguard the health, safety, and welfare of its citizens. As a result of this authority, the individual states are responsible for intrastate isolation and quarantine practices, and they conduct their activities in accordance with their respective statutes.

State and local laws and regulations regarding the issues of compelled isolation and quarantine vary widely. Historically, some states have codified extensive procedural provisions related to the enforcement of these public health measures, whereas other states rely on older statutory provisions that can be very broad. In some jurisdictions, local health departments are governed by the provisions of state law; in other settings, local health authorities may be responsible for enforcing state or more stringent local measures. In many states, violation of a quarantine order constitutes a criminal misdemeanor. (See also Turning Point Model State Public Health Act described here).

Federal Law

The HHS Secretary has statutory responsibility for preventing the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the United States, e.g., at international ports of arrival, and from one state or possession into another.

The communicable diseases for which federal isolation and quarantine are authorized are set forth through executive order of the President and includes “Influenza caused by novel or reemergent influenza viruses that are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic.” See Executive Order: Amendment to E.O. 13295 Relating to Certain Influenza Viruses and Quarantinable Communicable Diseases, April 1, 2005.

By statute, U.S. Customs and Coast Guard officers are required to aid in the enforcement of quarantine rules and regulations. Violation of federal quarantine rules and regulations constitutes a criminal misdemeanor, punishable by fine and/or imprisonment.

Interplay between Federal and State/Local Laws

States and local jurisdictions have primary responsibility for isolation and quarantine within their borders. The federal government has authority under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution to prevent the interstate spread of disease.

The federal government has primary responsibility for preventing the introduction of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the United States.

By statute, the HHS Secretary may accept state and local assistance in the enforcement of federal quarantine regulations and may assist state and local officials in the control of communicable diseases. It is possible for federal, state, and local health authorities simultaneously to have separate but concurrent legal quarantine power in a particular situation (e.g., an arriving aircraft at a large city airport).

Because isolation and quarantine are “police power” functions, public health officials at the federal, state, and local levels may occasionally seek the assistance of their respective law enforcement counterparts to enforce a public health order.

[End of Isolation and Quarantine]

to:

Legal page is for legal issues surrounding pandemic preparedness (e.g., isolation and quarantine).

Political page is for political aspects of pandemic preparedness and avian flu of a general nature and impact. Opinions and rants are not generally appropriate for this section. Articles and links should be organized by date, most recent first.

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Other Entries:

  • Most Canadians don’t feel avian flu is a threat: poll - from March 28, 2005
  • Ethics of stockpiling flu drugs for doctors’ relatives questioned - Canadian story, from June 24, 2005
  • The Issues of Thimerosal and Ethylmercury Toxicity
  • U.S. chastised on flu preparedness - Oakland Tribune June 26, 2005
  • Partner Companies Fighting Over Rights to Avian Flu Drug - New York Times June 24, 2005 reporting lawsuit between Tamiflu patent holder Gilead Sciences Inc. and manufacturer/distributor, Roche.
  • Roche sees no major impact from Tamiflu claim - Reuters June 24, 2005 report on Gilead/Roche disagreement.
  • WHO’s new Outbreak Communication Guidelines on the WHO website.

June 30, 2005, at 08:58 AM by DemFromCT - new pages for legal and political
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Legal and Political Issues

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Legal and Political Issues

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June 29, 2005, at 09:22 AM by pogge - fix sidescroll
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Summery: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1, 2005 executive order adding some Influenza viruses to the list of quarantinable diseases.

to:

Summary: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1, 2005 executive order adding some Influenza viruses to the list of quarantinable diseases.

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_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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June 29, 2005, at 07:57 AM by DemFromCT - spellcheck
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Other Enteries:

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Other Entries:

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State and local laws and regulations regarding the issues of compelled isolation and quarantine vary widely. Historically, some states have codified extensive procedural provisions related to the enforcement of these public health measures, whereas other states rely on older statutory provisions that can be very broad. In some jurisdictions, local health departments are governed by the provisions of state law; in other settings, local health authorities may be responsible for enforcing state or more stringent local measures. In many states, violation of a quarantine order constitutes a criminal misdemeanor. (See also Turning Point Model State Public Health Act described here).

to:

State and local laws and regulations regarding the issues of compelled isolation and quarantine vary widely. Historically, some states have codified extensive procedural provisions related to the enforcement of these public health measures, whereas other states rely on older statutory provisions that can be very broad. In some jurisdictions, local health departments are governed by the provisions of state law; in other settings, local health authorities may be responsible for enforcing state or more stringent local measures. In many states, violation of a quarantine order constitutes a criminal misdemeanor. (See also Turning Point Model State Public Health Act described here).

June 29, 2005, at 07:55 AM by DemFromCT - added model Public health act
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State and local laws and regulations regarding the issues of compelled isolation and quarantine vary widely. Historically, some states have codified extensive procedural provisions related to the enforcement of these public health measures, whereas other states rely on older statutory provisions that can be very broad. In some jurisdictions, local health departments are governed by the provisions of state law; in other settings, local health authorities may be responsible for enforcing state or more stringent local measures. In many states, violation of a quarantine order constitutes a criminal misdemeanor.

to:

State and local laws and regulations regarding the issues of compelled isolation and quarantine vary widely. Historically, some states have codified extensive procedural provisions related to the enforcement of these public health measures, whereas other states rely on older statutory provisions that can be very broad. In some jurisdictions, local health departments are governed by the provisions of state law; in other settings, local health authorities may be responsible for enforcing state or more stringent local measures. In many states, violation of a quarantine order constitutes a criminal misdemeanor. (See also Turning Point Model State Public Health Act described here).

June 29, 2005, at 02:22 AM by Lawson - minor
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By statute, the HHS Secretary may accept state and local assistance in the enforcement of federal quarantine regulations and may assist state and local officials in the control of communicable diseases.

It is possible for federal, state, and local health authorities simultaneously to have separate but concurrent legal quarantine power in a particular situation (e.g., an arriving aircraft at a large city airport).

to:

By statute, the HHS Secretary may accept state and local assistance in the enforcement of federal quarantine regulations and may assist state and local officials in the control of communicable diseases. It is possible for federal, state, and local health authorities simultaneously to have separate but concurrent legal quarantine power in a particular situation (e.g., an arriving aircraft at a large city airport).

June 29, 2005, at 02:18 AM by Lawson - minor rewording for clarity
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Summery: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of Quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1, 2005 amendment to Executive Order 13295 which added Influenza Viruses with pandemic potential to the list of quarantinable communicable diseases.

to:

Summery: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1, 2005 executive order adding some Influenza viruses to the list of quarantinable diseases.

June 29, 2005, at 02:01 AM by Lawson - formatting
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CDC Fact Sheet on Isolation and Quarantine

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Fact Sheet for Isolation and Quarantine

June 29, 2005, at 01:58 AM by Lawson - added edits and reference to executive order 13295
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The communicable diseases for which federal isolation and quarantine are authorized are set forth through executive order of the President and include cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, plague, smallpox, yellow fever, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was added to this list in April 2003.

to:

The communicable diseases for which federal isolation and quarantine are authorized are set forth through executive order of the President and includes “Influenza caused by novel or reemergent influenza viruses that are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic.” See Executive Order: Amendment to E.O. 13295 Relating to Certain Influenza Viruses and Quarantinable Communicable Diseases, April 1, 2005.

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[End of Isolation and Quarantine] _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Other Enteries:

June 29, 2005, at 01:51 AM by Lawson - Quarantine article
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Summery: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of Quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1 2005amendment to Executive Order 13295 adding Influenza Viruses with pandemic potential to the list of quarantinable communicable diseases.

to:

Summery: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of Quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1, 2005 amendment to Executive Order 13295 which added Influenza Viruses with pandemic potential to the list of quarantinable communicable diseases.

Introduction

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State and Local Law

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State and Local Law

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Federal Law

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Federal Law

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Interplay between Federal and State/Local Laws

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Interplay between Federal and State/Local Laws

June 29, 2005, at 01:48 AM by Lawson - editing quarantine article
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Legal Authorities for Isolation and Quarantine

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Isolation and Quarantine

CDC Fact Sheet on Isolation and Quarantine

Summery: This article summarizes the legal underpinnings for the imposition of Quarantine by state and federal authorities. Largely excerpted from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf with updates to reflect the April 1 2005amendment to Executive Order 13295 adding Influenza Viruses with pandemic potential to the list of quarantinable communicable diseases.

June 29, 2005, at 01:38 AM by Lawson - cut and paste work
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Interplay between Federal and State/Local Laws

States and local jurisdictions have primary responsibility for isolation and quarantine within their borders. The federal government has authority under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution to prevent the interstate spread of disease.

The federal government has primary responsibility for preventing the introduction of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the United States.

By statute, the HHS Secretary may accept state and local assistance in the enforcement of federal quarantine regulations and may assist state and local officials in the control of communicable diseases.

It is possible for federal, state, and local health authorities simultaneously to have separate but concurrent legal quarantine power in a particular situation (e.g., an arriving aircraft at a large city airport).

Because isolation and quarantine are “police power” functions, public health officials at the federal, state, and local levels may occasionally seek the assistance of their respective law enforcement counterparts to enforce a public health order.

June 29, 2005, at 01:36 AM by Lawson - working on a cut and paste problem
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The communicable diseases for which federal isolation and quarantine are authorized are set forth through executive order of the President and include cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, plague, smallpox, yellow fever, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was added to this list in April 2003.

By statute, U.S. Customs and Coast Guard officers are required to aid in the enforcement of quarantine rules and regulations. Violation of federal quarantine rules and regulations constitutes a criminal misdemeanor, punishable by fine and/or imprisonment.

June 29, 2005, at 01:35 AM by Lawson - working on a problem
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to:

Federal Law

The HHS Secretary has statutory responsibility for preventing the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the United States, e.g., at international ports of arrival, and from one state or possession into another.

June 29, 2005, at 01:32 AM by Lawson - Second part of quarantine authorities
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to:

State and Local Law

A state’s authority to compel isolation and quarantine within its borders is derived from its inherent “police power”—the authority of a state government to enact laws and promote regulations to safeguard the health, safety, and welfare of its citizens. As a result of this authority, the individual states are responsible for intrastate isolation and quarantine practices, and they conduct their activities in accordance with their respective statutes.

State and local laws and regulations regarding the issues of compelled isolation and quarantine vary widely. Historically, some states have codified extensive procedural provisions related to the enforcement of these public health measures, whereas other states rely on older statutory provisions that can be very broad. In some jurisdictions, local health departments are governed by the provisions of state law; in other settings, local health authorities may be responsible for enforcing state or more stringent local measures. In many states, violation of a quarantine order constitutes a criminal misdemeanor.

June 29, 2005, at 01:27 AM by Lawson - Start of Legal Authority for Quarantine article
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to:

Isolation and quarantine are two common public health strategies designed to protect the public by preventing exposure to infected or potentially infected persons.

In general, isolation refers to the separation of persons who have a specific infectious illness from those who are healthy and the restriction of their movement to stop the spread of that illness. Isolation is a standard procedure used in hospitals today for patients with tuberculosis and certain other infectious diseases.

Quarantine, in contrast, generally refers to the separation and restriction of movement of persons who, while not yet ill, have been exposed to an infectious agent and therefore may become infectious. Quarantine of exposed persons is a public health strategy, like isolation, that is intended to stop the spread of infectious disease.

Both isolation and quarantine may be conducted on a voluntary basis or compelled on a mandatory basis through legal authority.

June 29, 2005, at 01:26 AM by Lawson - Removed incorrect link
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June 29, 2005, at 01:13 AM by Lawson - Added legal authority for Isolation and Quarantine factsheet
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Legal Authorities for Isolation and Quarantine

Attach:http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/sars_facts/factsheetlegal.pdf Δ

June 28, 2005, at 02:20 PM by RevealAll - Additional political document: WHO\\
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  • WHO’s new Outbreak Communication Guidelines on the WHO website.
June 27, 2005, at 02:13 PM by jotter - added NY times article on Gilead/Roche lawsuit, links to Tamiflu and Gilead
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  • Partner Companies Fighting Over Rights to Avian Flu Drug - New York Times June 24, 2005 reporting lawsuit between Tamiflu patent holder Gilead Sciences Inc. and manufacturer/distributor, Roche.
  • Roche sees no major impact from Tamiflu claim - Reuters June 24, 2005 report on Gilead/Roche disagreement.
June 27, 2005, at 02:00 PM by jotter - added Oakland Tribune story
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  • U.S. chastised on flu preparedness - Oakland Tribune June 26, 2005
June 27, 2005, at 09:31 AM by pogge - Added Charles Roten's Thimerosal piece
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June 27, 2005, at 08:17 AM by DemFromCT - minor edit of message
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  • Ethics of stockpiling flu drugs for doctors’ relatives questioned - from June 24, 2005
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  • Ethics of stockpiling flu drugs for doctors’ relatives questioned - Canadian story, from June 24, 2005
June 27, 2005, at 08:16 AM by DemFromCT - added ethics story
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  • Ethics of stockpiling flu drugs for doctors’ relatives questioned - from June 24, 2005
June 26, 2005, at 10:50 PM by DemFromCT - added story
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  • Most Canadians don’t feel avian flu is a threat: poll - from March 28, 2005
June 26, 2005, at 01:31 PM by pogge - Initial setup
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Page last modified on January 09, 2008, at 11:48 AM by Bronco Bill